Jackie is the antibiotic of a glamorous icon – Buzz News
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Jackie is the antibiotic of a glamorous icon

By expatriating for the first time in the United States, Pablo Larraín could have lost his way. But this portrait of JFK’s widow is in fact an opportunity for the Chilean to dig his patterns brilliantly.

This Sunday, Arte will broadcast Jackie unscrambled for the first time Here is the review of Première , originally published for its theatrical release in early 2017.

What strikes you in front of Jackie, beyond her impressive formal mastery, is her consistency with the rest of Pablo Larraín’s filmography. The bet was not won in advance. Because working in Hollywood implies new constraints for a filmmaker accustomed to filming in Chile. Then because Jackie was initially to be directed by Darren Aronofsky, with Rachel Weisz instead of Natalie Portman. Finally, because the very subject of the film may a priori seem foreign to the director of El Club, until now obsessed with the political repression of his country, as evidenced by his trilogy on the Pinochet dictatorship (Tony Manero, Santiago 73- Post Mortem, and No). And yet, it remains a pure “Larrainien” film. Like No and especially Neruda, it is above all a deconstruction enterprise.

A structure already tested in his brilliant Neruda, where he is interested in the police hunt for the communist poet in 1948. With Jackie, Pablo Larraín zooms in on the hours following the Kennedy assassination on November 22, 1963: a decisive moment in the becoming icon of the president’s wife. 

More than the drama itself, it’s Jackie’s reaction that fascinates him. The public image that she had patiently developed with her husband, especially during a visit to the White House in front of the television cameras (a masquerade of which flashbacks mischievously reveal us behind the scenes), this reassuring and glamorous media mirror just broke in the blood. Jackie will repair it with formidable efficiency: by coolly controlling the story she wants to leave to the media (tasty oratorical games with Billy Crudup as a journalist for Life), but also by orchestrating a funeral for her husband as flamboyant as Lincoln’s, despite national paranoia – ” a real spectacle, ”the journalist would later congratulate her, without irony. 

As for the doubts, the emotional “truth”, Jackie will leave them to God (John Hurt as a priest) and to the Kubrickian corridors of a White House haunted by its dead presidents. Because the most important is elsewhere: it is the political legacy of JFK in question. 

But History, Pablo Larraín repeats to us, is above all a matter of storytelling. So fiction. and this in spite of the national paranoia – “a real spectacle”, will congratulate it later the journalist, without irony. As for the doubts, the emotional “truth”, Jackie will leave them to God (John Hurt as a priest) and to the Kubrickian corridors of a White House haunted by its dead presidents. Because the most important is elsewhere: it is the political legacy of JFK in question. But History, Pablo Larraín repeats to us, is above all a matter of storytelling. 

So fiction. and this in spite of the national paranoia – “a real spectacle”, will congratulate it later the journalist, without irony. As for the doubts, the emotional “truth”, Jackie will leave them to God (John Hurt as a priest) and to the Kubrickian corridors of a White House haunted by its dead presidents. Because the most important is elsewhere: it is the political legacy of JFK in question. But History, Pablo Larraín repeats to us, is above all a matter of storytelling. So fiction. Pablo Larraín repeats to us, is above all about storytelling. So fiction. Pablo Larraín repeats to us, is above all about storytelling. So fiction.

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